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Rhodin, Annica (2004). The rise of opiophobia: Is history a barrier to prescribing? Paineurope, 4:3

December 22, 2009 | Filed Under: Latest Readings | Comments(0)

Dr. Rhodin is an anesthesiologist who is also a pain clinician in Uppsala, Sweden, where considerable basic science research has been produced. This is one of those historical reviews of opium that you keep in a special folder because when you need a need a review like this for a talk on CNCP you just can’t find one. This brief review ranges from some 30,000 years ago when Neanderthal Man first planted the opium poppy to deal, no doubt, with some very serious CNCP, to its present use (or non-use) in for treating chronic pain in medicine.  Dr. Adams Implications: I have only one point of disagreement with Dr. Rhodin. She states that “the use of opioids in chronic non-malignant pain remains controversial.” I disagree, in the same way that I disagree that, among those who specialize in interventional cardiology, how to treat mitral valve prolapse “remains controversial.” Among those who specialize in CNCP, there is probably as much consensus about how opioids should be used and for what rehabilitative purpose as there is, among interventional cardiologists, about how mitral valve prolapse should be used and for what cardiac rehabilitative purpose. In Court, the opinions of those who do not satisfy the Federal Rules of Evidence to qualify as “expert witnesses” are summarily dismissed. If we did likewise, we would soon see that, among those who qualify as “experts,” there is no “controversy” about the use of opioids in CNCP.

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